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Keywords:

  • subduction fluxes;
  • mantle chemical evolution;
  • island arc volcanism;
  • oceanic volcanism

[1] We assess the flux of incompatible trace elements into the deep mantle in the Aleutian, Central America, Izu-Bonin, Kurile, Lesser Antilles, Mariana, Sunda, and Tonga subduction zones. We use a simple mass balance approach in which we assume that all of the material lost from the subducting crust and sediment (the “slab”) is incorporated into the magmas erupted above the subduction zone, and we use these assumptions to calculate a residual slab composition. The calculated residual slabs are enriched in incompatible elements compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts and highly enriched compared to primitive or depleted mantle. Almost all of the subducted Nb, Ta, and intermediate and heavy rare earths survive into the deep mantle, as do most of the light rare earths. On average, 73% of Th and Pb, 74% of K, 79% of U, 80% of Rb, 80% of Sr, and 82% of Ba survive into the deep mantle. Pb/Ce ratios are systematically lower, and Nb/U ratios are systematically higher, in the deep mantle flux than they are in the flux of material into the trench. Nevertheless, most residual slabs have Pb/Ce and Nb/U ratios outside the typical mantle range. Changes to U/Pb and Th/U ratios tend to be small and are not systematic. Rb/Sr ratios significantly decrease in some subduction zones but increase in others. In contrast, Sm/Nd ratios increase by small but significant amounts in most arcs. Based on these results, we attempt to predict the Sr, Nd, and Pb composition of anciently recycled material now in the mantle. We find that such material would most resemble enriched mantle II–type oceanic island basalts (OIB). None of our calculated residual slabs would evolve to Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions similar to either high 238U/204Pb or enriched mantle I. The range of Sr and Pb isotope ratios in anciently recycled material is similar to that seen in modern OIB, but Nd isotopic compositions do not range to ɛNd values as low as those in some modern OIB. Neither radiogenic nor unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions can be exclusively associated with recycled material.