Dynamics of soap bubble bursting and its implications to volcano acoustics

Authors

  • V. Vidal,

    1. Laboratorio de Física No Lineal and CIMAT, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago, Chile
    2. Laboratoire de Physique, Université de Lyon, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS, Lyon, France
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  • M. Ripepe,

    1. Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
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  • T. Divoux,

    1. Laboratorio de Física No Lineal and CIMAT, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago, Chile
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  • D. Legrand,

    1. Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Geofísica, Santiago, Chile
    2. Now at Departamento de Vulcanología, Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico.
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  • J.-C. Géminard,

    1. Laboratorio de Física No Lineal and CIMAT, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago, Chile
    2. Laboratoire de Physique, Université de Lyon, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS, Lyon, France
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  • F. Melo

    1. Laboratorio de Física No Lineal and CIMAT, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago, Chile
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Abstract

[1] In order to assess the physical mechanisms at stake when giant gas bubbles burst at the top of a magma conduit, laboratory experiments have been performed. An overpressurized gas cavity is initially closed by a thin liquid film, which suddenly bursts. The acoustic signal produced by the bursting is investigated. The key result is that the amplitude and energy of the acoustic signal strongly depend on the film rupture time. As the rupture time is uncontrolled in the experiments and in the field, the measurement of the acoustic excess pressure in the atmosphere, alone, cannot provide any information on the overpressure inside the bubble before explosion. This could explain the low energy partitioning between infrasound, seismic and explosive dynamics often observed on volcanoes.

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