Steps toward “useful” hydroclimatic scenarios for water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin

Authors

  • Anthony S. Kiem,

    1. Environmental and Climate Change Research Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Danielle C. Verdon-Kidd

    1. Environmental and Climate Change Research Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
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Abstract

[1] There is currently a distinct gap between what climate science can provide and information that is practically useful for (and needed by) natural resource managers. Improved understanding, and model representations, of interactions between the various climate drivers (both regional and global scale), combined with increased knowledge about the interactions between climate processes and hydrological processes at the regional scale, is necessary for improved attribution of climate change impacts, forecasting at a range of temporal scales and extreme event risk profiling (e.g., flood, drought, and bushfire). It is clear that the science has a long way to go in closing these research gaps; however, in the meantime water resource managers in the Murray-Darling Basin, and elsewhere, require hydroclimatic projections (i.e., seasonal to multidecadal future scenarios) that are regionally specific and, importantly, take into account the impacts, and associated uncertainties, of both natural climate variability and anthropogenic change. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches for supplying this information are discussed in this paper.

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