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Keywords:

  • graduate education;
  • interdisciplinary;
  • global environmenal change

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

The transboundary nature of global environmental change demands collaborative, multiscale, interdisciplinary research [U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 2005]. This requires “a new kind of scientist” [Schmidt and Moyer, 2008]; collaborators must develop both sufficient understanding of one another's work and the skills to integrate data sets and expertise. Although numerous interdisciplinary academic programs have emerged to address this demand, success varies widely. While many address cultural and financial impediments to interdisciplinary research [Weingart, 2000; Rhoten, 2004], there is little discussion of the skills that facilitate interdisciplinary scholarship and how to obtain them.


Acknowledgments

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

The authors thank Ronald Mitchell and C. Susan Weiler for organizing and leading DISCCRS. DISCCRS is supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grants SES-0931402 to the University of Oregon and SES-0932916 to Whitman College and NASA grant NNX10AJ53G.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References
  • Cook, C., F.Heath, and R. L.Thompson (2000), A meta-Analysis of response rates in Web- or Internet-based surveys, Educ. Psychol. Meas., 60(6),821836, doi:10.1177/00131640021970934.
  • Rhoten, D. (2004), Interdisciplinary research: Trend or transition, Items Issues, 5,611.
  • Schmidt, G., and E.Moyer (2008), A new kind of scientist, Nat. Rep. Clim. Change, 2,102103, doi:10.1038/climate.2008.76.
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences (2005), Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research, Natl. Acad. Press, Washington, D. C.
  • Weingart, P. (2000), Interdisciplinarity: The paradoxical discourse, in Practising Interdisciplinarity, edited by P.Weingart and N.Stehr, pp. 2541, Univ. of Toronto Press, Toronto, Ont., Canada.