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Keywords:

  • atmospheric modelling

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

[1] Lagrangian models (LMs) track the movement of fluid parcels in their moving frame of reference. As such, scientists using LMs are forced, in a way, to imagine themselves moving with the parcel and experiencing the effects of advection, turbulence, and changes in the parcel's environment. LMs have advanced in sophistication over recent decades, allowing them to be used increasingly for both scientific and societal purposes. For example, it is common practice now for researchers around the world to apply LMs to examine a wide spectrum of geophysical phenomena. Atmospheric chemists can track intercontinental transport of pollution plumes [Stohl et al., 2002] or airborne radioactivity [Wotawa et al., 2006]. By running LMs backward in time [Flesch et al., 1995; Lin et al., 2003], instrumentalists can establish the source regions of observed atmospheric species with high computational efficiency [Ryall et al., 2001]. Therefore, LMs are being used increasingly to quantify sources and sinks of greenhouse gases by combining simulations with observations in an inverse modeling framework [Trusilova et al., 2010]. Such “top-down” emissions estimation is receiving growing acceptance as an independent tool to test the veracity of emissions inventories and to verify adherence to treaties.


Acknowledgments

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

We thank members of the program committee of the upcoming AGU Chapman Conference on Advances in Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, who commented on another version of this document. The members (in alphabetical order) are A. Andrews, M. Cassiani, R. Draxler, P. Konopka, K. Law, T. Nehrkorn, P. Seibert, V. Shershakov, A. Stohl, B. Stunder, D. Thomson, A. Vermeulen, P. Webley, H. Wernli, J. Wilson, and G. Wotawa.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References