Al Gore attends Fall Meeting session on Earth observing satellite

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Abstract

Former U.S. vice president Al Gore, making unscheduled remarks at an AGU Fall Meeting session, said, “The reason you see so many pictures” of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite at this session is “that it already has been built.” However, “because one of its primary missions was to help document global warming, it was canceled. So for those who are interested in struggling against political influence,” Gore said, “the benefits have been documented well here.” Gore made his comments after the third oral presentation at the 8 December session entitled “Earth Observations From the L1 (Lagrangian Point No. 1),” which focused on the capabilities of and progress on refurbishing DSCOVR. The satellite, formerly called Triana, had been proposed by Gore in 1998 to collect climate data. Although Triana was built, it was never launched: Congress mandated that before the satellite could be sent into space the National Academies of Science needed to confirm that the science it would be doing was worthwhile. By the time the scientific validation was complete, the satellite “was no longer compatible with the space shuttle manifest,” Robert C. Smith, program manager for strategic integration at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, told Eos.