Modeling the daytime, equatorial ionospheric ion densities associated with the observed, four-cell longitude patterns in E × B drift velocities

Authors

  • Eduardo A. Araujo-Pradere,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    2. Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • Tzu-Wei Fang,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    2. Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • David N. Anderson,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    2. Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • Mariangel Fedrizzi,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    2. Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • Russell Stoneback

    1. Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas, USA
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Abstract

[1] Previous studies have quantified the longitude gradients in E × Bdrift associated with the four-cell tidal structures and have confirmed that these sharp gradients exist on a day-to-day basis. For this paper, we incorporate the Ion Velocity Meter (IVM) sensor on the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite to obtain the daytime, verticalE × B drift velocities at the magnetic equator as a function of longitude, local time, and season and to theoretically calculate the F region ion densities as a function of altitude, latitude, longitude, and local time using the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere model. We compare calculated ion densities assuming no longitude gradients in E × Bdrift velocities with calculated ion densities incorporating the IVM-observedE × Bdrift at the boundaries of the four-cell tidal structures in the Peruvian and the Atlantic longitude sectors. Incorporating the IVM-observedE × B drift velocities, the ion density crests rapidly converge to the magnetic equator between 285 and 300°E geographic longitude, are absent between 300° and 305°, and move away from the magnetic equator between 305° and 340°. In essence, the steeper the longitude gradient in E × B drifts, the steeper the longitude gradient in the equatorial anomaly crest location.

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