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Keywords:

  • salinity;
  • satellite;
  • oceanography;
  • climate;
  • Aquarius

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

Understanding the links between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate variations requires knowledge of ocean surface salinity. NASA's Aquarius satellite mission (http://aquarius.nasa.gov), which monitors the global open ocean surface salinity field, embarked on its science operations phase after completing the in-orbit performance assessment on 1 December 2011. The data (Figure 1) are already showing new and interesting information.


Acknowledgments

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References

The Aquarius/SAC-D success is a tribute to the extraordinary talent, dedication, and hard work of the many scientists, managers, engineers, and technicians in the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Italy, France, and Canada whose individual contributions made this mission possible.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. References
  • Dohan, K., and N.Maximenko (2010), Monitoring ocean currents with satellite sensors, Oceanography, 23(4),94103, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2010.08.
  • Lagerloef, G., et al. (2008), The Aquarius/SAC-D mission: Designed to meet the salinity remote sensing challenge, Oceanography, 21(1),6881, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2008.68.
  • Lagerloef, G., F.Wentz, S.Yueh, H.Kao, G.Johnson, and J.Lyman (2012), Aquarius satellite mission provides new, detailed view of sea surface salinity, in State of the Climate in 2011, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., in press.