Kiwi magic: New Zealand paleomagnetism comes of age



When the New Zealand Geological Society held its annual meeting in November 1988 in Hamilton, they scheduled a major symposium, Palaeomagnetism and Its Applications in the New Zealand Region. That interest and enthusiasm for paleomagnetic research in New Zealand has reached such a level is a tribute to those who, over the past 30 years, have built expertise and developed our facilities to international standards.

In 1957 Colin Bull became the first geophysicist appointed to the physics department at Victoria University, in Wellington. He brought with him from the United Kingdom a magnet assembly that was incorporated into an astatic magnetometer by Jim Gellen [1959] as part of his Master's degree project.