Characteristic Variations in the Antarctic Ionosphere

  1. A. H. Waynick
  1. D. E. Patton,
  2. V. L. Peterson,
  3. G. H. Stonehocker and
  4. J. W. Wright

Published Online: 14 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR004p0047

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

How to Cite

Patton, D. E., Peterson, V. L., Stonehocker, G. H. and Wright, J. W. (1965) Characteristic Variations in the Antarctic Ionosphere, in Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise (ed A. H. Waynick), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR004p0047

Author Information

  1. Central Radio Propagation Laboratory, National Bureau of Standards, Boulder·, Colorado

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1965

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901046

Online ISBN: 9781118664537

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Keywords:

  • Antarctic E and F1 regions;
  • Chapman theory;
  • Electron density profile;
  • Extreme ultraviolet (EUV);
  • Universal time (UT)

Summary

Studies of data from antarctic ionospheric soundings taken during and after the IGY are presented. The E layer, but not the F1 layer, has a weaker dependence on cosx in the auroral zone than out of the auroral zone, as Scott [1952] found previously for the arctic ionosphere. The E layer is also found to be less sensitive to solar activity than the F1 layer, as measured by the 10.7-cm radio flux. Simultaneous variations throughout the whole polar ionosphere, manifested in universal time (UT) variations, are found in several ionospheric parameters: the total number of electrons in a cm2 column below the F2 peak and the height of the F2 peak show a UT variation in phase with that of ƒ0F2 found by Duncan [1962]; a UT variation of opposite phase is found in the F1 layer. Finally, the thickness of the F2 peak, which is related to the local temperature, does not show a UT variation but is larger in the summer (December) than in the winter. A parameter related to the maximum electron density in the F1 layer also has a minimum in summer, indicating that the F1 temperature is highest in summer.