An Electron Bombardment Theory of High-Latitude Sporadic E

  1. A. H. Waynick
  1. S. M. Bennett and
  2. T. M. Noel

Published Online: 14 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR004p0077

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

How to Cite

Bennett, S. M. and Noel, T. M. (1965) An Electron Bombardment Theory of High-Latitude Sporadic E, in Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise (ed A. H. Waynick), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR004p0077

Author Information

  1. Research and Advanced Development Division, AVCO Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1965

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901046

Online ISBN: 9781118664537

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Keywords:

  • Dilemma;
  • Electron bombardment theory;
  • High-latitude Sporadic E;
  • Particle bombardment theory;
  • Power spectra, estimates

Summary

On the basis of a power spectrum analysis of the ƒ0Es time series at the antarctic stations Wilkes and Byrd, periodic tendencies of the order of hours were uncovered. The principal (and secondary) periods in hours are: Wilkes, 1.7 (2.4); Byrd, 2.2 (1.1). It is possible to derive a model of quasi-periodic variations that is related to the loss of electrons from the Van Allen radiation belt. Thin-layer sporadic E results from the magnetospheric time-of–flight spectrometer effect when the source is longitudinally small. The periodicity of the resultant variation in electron density at a point longitudinally removed from the disturbance source (but on the same L shell) is dependent upon the particle source spectrum and the Coulomb-scattering loss coefficient, and these factors are, at present, poorly understood. The longitude effect in high-latitude sporadic–E occurrence is ascribed to the longitudinal dependence of the effective loss coefficient for a particle whose mirror point drifts on a surface of constant magnetic field strength.