Long-Period Geomagnetic Oscillations in Southern High Latitudes

  1. A. H. Waynick
  1. Teruo Sato

Published Online: 14 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR004p0173

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise

How to Cite

Sato, T. (1965) Long-Period Geomagnetic Oscillations in Southern High Latitudes, in Geomagnetism and Aeronomy: Studies in the Ionosphere, Geomagnetism and Atmospheric Radio Noise (ed A. H. Waynick), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR004p0173

Author Information

  1. Research and Advanced Development Division, AVCO Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1965

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901046

Online ISBN: 9781118664537

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Keywords:

  • Geomagnetic data;
  • Hydromagnetic waves;
  • Long-period oscillations;
  • Southern auroral zone;
  • Southern High Latitudes

Summary

Long-period geomagnetic oscillations in high southern latitudes with periods of 1 to several minutes are studied and their cause is considered. Most long-period oscillations in high latitudes are a local phenomenon taking place in a specified part of the auroral and polar latitudes, especially in the auroral. Local times of maximum occurrence frequency are different at each station. Shapes of oscillation are not coincident between stations. When long-period oscillations arise simultaneously over the globe, variations in high latitudes are of a different nature from those in middle and low latitudes. Most long-period oscillations in high latitudes appear to be caused by the electric current that is related to the incidence of charged particles into the ionosphere. Long-period oscillations generated by hydromagnetic waves, such as seen in middle and low latitudes, are usually masked or deformed in high latitudes by large amplitude oscillations of an ionospheric origin.