The Vanderford Submarine Valley, Vincennes Bay, Antarctica1

  1. Jarvis B. Hadley
  1. Richard L. Cameron

Published Online: 3 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR006p0211

Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic

Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic

How to Cite

Cameron, R. L. (1965) The Vanderford Submarine Valley, Vincennes Bay, Antarctica1, in Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic (ed J. B. Hadley), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR006p0211

Author Information

  1. Institute of Polar Studies, Ohio State University, Columbus

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1965

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118655733

Online ISBN: 9781118668528

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Keywords:

  • Sogne Fjord;
  • Topography;
  • Vanderford submarine valley;
  • Vincennes Bay;
  • Windmill Islands

Summary

In Vincennes Bay, on the coast of Wilkes Land in East Antarctica, there is a deep submarine valley that extends southeastward for 24 km to the ice front of Vanderford Glacier, an ice stream in the continental ice cover. The ice stream is afloat for at least 35 km inland, and ice thickness measurements 130 km inland suggest that the submarine valley may penetrate the continent for some distance. The valley is 12 km wide and 2000 meters deep. Comparison with three valley types (subaerial canyon, submarine canyon, and fjord) shows that the Vanderford valley is morphologically similar to a fjord. It is relatively narrow but deep, and it has high steep walls, a flat valley bottom, and an undulating longitudinal profile with a landward gradient of 1 degree. Vanderford submarine valley has a maximum water depth of 2287 meters, which is 837 meters greater than that of Northwest Fjord in Scoresby Sound, Greenland, presently considered the world's deepest fjord.