Anatomy of the Axis in Vertebraria1

  1. Jarvis B. Hadley
  1. James M. Schopf

Published Online: 3 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR006p0217

Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic

Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic

How to Cite

Schopf, J. M. (1965) Anatomy of the Axis in Vertebraria1 , in Geology and Paleontology of the Antarctic (ed J. B. Hadley), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR006p0217

Author Information

  1. U.S. Geological Survey, Columbus, Ohio

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1965

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118655733

Online ISBN: 9781118668528

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Anatomy axis in Vertebraria;
  • Caudex;
  • Four-layered cortex;
  • Taxonomic alliance;
  • Vertebraria axes

Summary

A radiate series of large lysigenous pockets and intervening woody trusses that originated from lateral roots explain the strange form of vertebrarian fossils. The axis is a true root with a specialized gymnospermous anatomy in which primary xylem is ephemeral. It lacks a woody core. Vertebraria, represented by roots, may well be correlative with Glossopteris, represented by foliage. Both genera should be assigned tentatively to the same family on the basis of persistent association as dominating elements of the southern Permian vegetation.