A Faunistic Study of the Planktonic Ostracods (Myodocopa, Halocyprididae) Collected on Eleven Cruises of the Eltanin between New Zealand, Australia, the Ross Sea, and the South Indian Ocean

  1. Louis S. Kornicker
  1. Georgiana B. Deevey

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR032p0131

Biology of the Antarctic Seas X

Biology of the Antarctic Seas X

How to Cite

Deevey, G. B. (1981) A Faunistic Study of the Planktonic Ostracods (Myodocopa, Halocyprididae) Collected on Eleven Cruises of the Eltanin between New Zealand, Australia, the Ross Sea, and the South Indian Ocean, in Biology of the Antarctic Seas X (ed L. S. Kornicker), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR032p0131

Author Information

  1. Florida State Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1981

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901763

Online ISBN: 9781118664674

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Keywords:

  • Halocyprididae;
  • Marine zooplankton—Antarctic regions;
  • Eltanin (Ship);
  • Crustacea—Antarctic regions

Summary

The region covered by the 11 Eltanin cruises extended from 180° to 95°E and from ca. 34°S to 78°S and included the southeast Indian Ocean south of Australia, the Tasman Sea, and the South Pacific from New Zealand to the Ross Sea. Of the 326 samples collected in these waters, 150 were obtained with plankton nets and 176 with 1- or 3-m Isaacs-Kidd trawls. Sixty species of halocyprid ostracods were identified from these samples, including four new species. Conchoecia elegans was the commonest species, followed by C. serrulata, C. hettacra, C. antarctica, C. chuni, C. isocheira, C. skogsbergi, and C. teretivalvata. Highest numbers of species were found between the Subtropical and the Antarctic convergences; 17 species were taken south of 60°S, south of the Antarctic Convergence, and 9 of these were found south of 70°S. C. antipoda, C. belgicae, C. brachyaskos, C. hettacra, C. isocheira, and C. skogsbergi occurred down to 77°–78°S.