Climate, Geomorphology, and Glaciology of the Shackleton Glacier area, Queen Maud Mountains, Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

  1. Mort D. Turner and
  2. John E. Splettstoesser
  1. Kerby E. LaPrade

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR036p0163

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

How to Cite

LaPrade, K. E. (1986) Climate, Geomorphology, and Glaciology of the Shackleton Glacier area, Queen Maud Mountains, Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica, in Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains (eds M. D. Turner and J. E. Splettstoesser), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR036p0163

Author Information

  1. East Texas State University, Commerce, Texas 75428

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901848

Online ISBN: 9781118664797

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Congelifraction;
  • Glaciology;
  • Mechanical and chemical weathering;
  • Moraines;
  • Shackleton Glacier;
  • Truncated spurs

Summary

The study area, 170°W–180°, 84°22′–85°45′S, centers around Shackleton Glacier, which flows northward across the central part of the Queen Maud Mountains, central sector of the Transantarctic Mountains. The climate is polar arid. Shackleton Glacier and its tributaries drain essentially all of the study area and have influenced the landforms, especially in the southern part. Weathering is mainly mechanical, including frost wedging, granular disintegration, alternate heating and cooling with hydration, and honeycombing. Well-developed patterned ground has resulted from frost wedging. Ancient chemical weathering is indicated by in situ alteration and replacement of minerals. Present chemical weathering consists of minor amounts of iron staining and solution pits. Glacial erosion features include benches, broad summits, striations, cirques, cols, aretes, horns, truncated spurs, hanging tributaries and valleys, and U-shaped valleys. Depositional features include tillite; stranded lateral moraines; lateral, medial, and ground moraines; and rock glaciers. Glaciations of two age groups are noted: Queen Maud Glaciation of middle to late Tertiary age and “Final” Glaciation of Quaternary age. The Final Glaciation includes several minor glacial phases. The Queen Maud and Final glaciations are tentatively correlated with other glaciations in the Transantarctic Mountains.