Potassium-Argon Age Determinations of Ferrar Group Rocks, Central Transantarctic Mountains

  1. Mort D. Turner and
  2. John E. Splettstoesser
  1. David H. Elliot1,
  2. Robert J. Fleck2 and
  3. John F. Sutter3

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR036p0197

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

How to Cite

Elliot, D. H., Fleck, R. J. and Sutter, J. F. (1986) Potassium-Argon Age Determinations of Ferrar Group Rocks, Central Transantarctic Mountains, in Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains (eds M. D. Turner and J. E. Splettstoesser), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR036p0197

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Polar Studies and Department of Geology and Mineralogy, the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210

  2. 2

    U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California 94025

  3. 3

    Department of Geology and Mineralogy, the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901848

Online ISBN: 9781118664797

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Keywords:

  • Ferrar Dolerite;
  • Kirkpatrick Basalt;
  • Mesozoic and Gondwana;
  • Paleontology;
  • Potassium-argon ages;
  • Queen Maud land

Summary

New potassium-argon radiometric ages for rocks of the Ferrar Group of the central Transantarctic Mountains range from 114 m.y. to 205 m.y. Young ages for the Kirkpatrick Basalt lie outside the range, Early or Middle Jurassic, permitted by paleontological data. The pattern of ages for the lavas is attributed to argon loss subsequent to initial cooling; the time of extrusion is given an age of 180 ± 5 m.y. Probably coeval diabase sills also yield low ages, but available data cannot eliminate the possibility of emplacement later than the lavas. It is suggested that the tholeiitic igneous activity was associated with rifting across Antarctica, and this possible failed arm of a triple junction subsequently was associated with the development of microplates in West Antarctica.