Geology of the Basement Complex, Western Queen Maud Mountains, Antarctica

  1. Mort D. Turner and
  2. John E. Splettstoesser
  1. F. Alton Wade and
  2. Carl A. Cathey

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR036p0429

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains

How to Cite

Wade, F. A. and Cathey, C. A. (1986) Geology of the Basement Complex, Western Queen Maud Mountains, Antarctica, in Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains (eds M. D. Turner and J. E. Splettstoesser), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR036p0429

Author Information

  1. Antarctic Research Center, The Museum, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901848

Online ISBN: 9781118664797

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Keywords:

  • Goldie and Greenlee formation;
  • Pre-Devonian complex;
  • Queen Maud Mountains;
  • Stratigraphy;
  • Taylor and Fairweather formation;
  • Taylor nunatak;
  • Waldron Spurs

Summary

The basement complex in the Queen Maud Mountains in the vicinity of the Shackleton Glacier is composed of late Precambrian-Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks and the Ordovician plutons which constitute the Queen Maud Batholith. Three formations in the ancient metasedimentary rocks are identified: the Goldie, Greenlee, and Taylor formations. The metasedimentary rocks in the Ramsey Glacier portion of the surveyed area are correlated with the Goldie Formation of the Holland Range, Queen Alexandra Range, and Queen Elizabeth Range to the north and west. It is late Precambrian. The Greenlee Formation is composed of nearshore clastics and minor amounts of volcanics and marbles. The age is probably late Precambrian-Cambrian. It is correlated with the Duncan Formation to the east. The Taylor Formation is primarily volcanoclastics and marbles. The upper portion, at least, is correlated with the Shackleton Limestone to the west and the Fairweather Formation to the east. The Queen Maud Batholith in the surveyed area is composed of adamellites, granodiorites, granites, alaskites, and tonalites. Radiometric ages indicate intrusion during the Ordovician.