Studies on the Zoarcidae (Teleostei: Perciformes) of the Southern Hemisphere: I. The Antarctic and Subantarctic Regions

  1. Louis S. Kornicker
  1. M. Eric Anderson

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/AR047p0059

Biology of the Antarctic Seas XIX

Biology of the Antarctic Seas XIX

How to Cite

Anderson, M. E. (1988) Studies on the Zoarcidae (Teleostei: Perciformes) of the Southern Hemisphere: I. The Antarctic and Subantarctic Regions, in Biology of the Antarctic Seas XIX (ed L. S. Kornicker), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/AR047p0059

Author Information

  1. Department of Ichthyology, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, California 94118

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901718

Online ISBN: 9781118666074

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Keywords:

  • Marine biology—Antarctic regions—Collected works

Summary

A systematic study of the fish family Zoarcidae from Antarctic and Subantarctic waters revealed the presence of 21 species in nine genera, including 4 species and two genera which are new to science. Dieidolycus leptodermatus, gen, et sp. nov., and Seleniolycus laevifasciatus (Torno, Tomo, and Marschoff, 1977) from deep water in the western Antarctic represent the two new, monotypic genera. Other new species include Lycenchelys nanospinata and Oidiphorus mcallisteri from the Scotia Sea and L. wilkesi from Bransfield Strait, Antarctica, The nominal genus Austrolycichthys Regan, 1913, is placed in synonymy with Pachycara Zugmayer, 1911, and two of its formerly included three species are placed in Ophthalmolycus Regan, 1913. The majority of specimens studied for this review came from recent collections of the U.S. Antarctic Research Program, but supplemental material from the museums of 11 other countries was used. Evidence from phylogenetic studies and the marine geological history of the eastern Pacific indicates that the present, nonnotothenooid Antarctic fish fauna may have its origins in the Miocene, rather than in the Pleistocene as suggested by previous workers.