17. Incorporating Ecological and Biogeochemical Information into Irrigation Models

  1. Erik Kristensen,
  2. Ralf R. Haese and
  3. Joel E. Kostka
  1. Carla M. Koretsky,
  2. Christof Meile and
  3. Philippe Van Cappellen

Published Online: 23 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/CE060p0341

Interactions Between Macro- and Microorganisms in Marine Sediments

Interactions Between Macro- and Microorganisms in Marine Sediments

How to Cite

Koretsky, C. M., Meile, C. and Van Cappellen, P. (2005) Incorporating Ecological and Biogeochemical Information into Irrigation Models, in Interactions Between Macro- and Microorganisms in Marine Sediments (eds E. Kristensen, R. R. Haese and J. E. Kostka), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/CE060p0341

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875902746

Online ISBN: 9781118665442

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Keywords:

  • Interactions between macro- and microorganisms in marine sediments

Summary

The construction and ventilation of macrofaunal burrows can fundamentally alter biogeochemical processes in marine sediments. Burrowing benthic organisms produce lateral heterogeneity, intensify the cycling of redox-sensitive elements, and create ecological niches for microbial life. To quantify the increased solute transport, termed bioirrigation, resulting from macrofaunal activities, a variety of models, such as the Aller tube model and the one-dimensional nonlocal exchange model, have been developed. These models have been successful at reproducing some of the effects of burrow venti-lation at early diagenetic scales. This chapter reviews the progress made in using existing and emerging reactive transport models to quantify the effects of bioirrigation and identifies current challenges to developing improved models. In particular, multidimensional models that account for reactive transport processes at the burrow-sediment interface, and the hydraulics associated with burrow ventilation, hold great promise for a more accurate representation of the role of benthic macrofauna in modern and ancient marine environments.