Glomar Explorer: Candidate for deep drilling ship of the '80's

Authors


Abstract

With aid of the outline elevations and the specifications listed on the cover figure, one can almost visualize the huge, bow-thrusted vessel that is slated to be the deep ocean drilling ship of the 1980's. The Glomar Explorer, former CIA ship, is to be converted for core drilling at incredible ocean depths of 2–4 km. The drilling will be ‘state-of-the-art’ in obtaining core under the most modern and safe drilling standards. It stretches the imagination to realize that safeguards such as blowout protectors, risers, and well head controls, which are now frequently employed in conventional offshore drilling, will be standard equipment on Explorer. When Explorer's drill touches bottom, at 4 km, it will penetrate and then extract core from an additional 1500 meters or more into the ocean floor. This heretofore inconceivable ship, platform, and rig is to be the replacement for the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) drill ship Glomar Challenger, which was responsible for the spectacular scientific progress in deep ocean studies during the 1970's.

Ancillary