Fishy evidence

Authors

  • Anonymous


Abstract

Adding to the ongoing debate over the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous period, a paleontologist from Purdue University recently uncovered a bed of 65-million-year old fish bones that bears the fingerprints of a meteorite impact. Gathering the fossils from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, William Zinsmeister discovered what he has termed a “horizon of death,” a 12-square-kilometer bone bed resting just above a layer of iridium. The element is rare on Earth but common to most meteorites.

The Purdue professor of geosciences believes the site provides strong evidence that the impact of an extraterrestrial object played at least some part in the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous.

Ancillary