1. Origin and Development of the Snake River Plain (SRP)—An overview

  1. Kerry L. Ruebelmann,
  2. Richard P. Smith,
  3. William F. Downs,
  4. R. L. Christiansen,
  5. W. R. Hacket,
  6. L. M. Morgan,
  7. W. P. Leeman,
  8. S. H. Wood,
  9. H. E. Malde and
  10. M. A. Kuntz
  1. William P. Leeman

Published Online: 17 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/FT305p0004

Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Volcanic Province: Jackson, Wyoming to Boise, Idaho July 21-29, 1989

Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Volcanic Province: Jackson, Wyoming to Boise, Idaho July 21-29, 1989

How to Cite

Leeman, W. P. (2013) Origin and Development of the Snake River Plain (SRP)—An overview, in Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Volcanic Province: Jackson, Wyoming to Boise, Idaho July 21-29, 1989 (eds K. L. Ruebelmann, R. P. Smith, W. F. Downs, R. L. Christiansen, W. R. Hacket, L. M. Morgan, W. P. Leeman, S. H. Wood, H. E. Malde and M. A. Kuntz), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/FT305p0004

Author Information

  1. Earth Sciences Division, National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875906270

Online ISBN: 9781118667026

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Keywords:

  • Crustal structure of SRP;
  • Petrologic and geochemical characteristics;
  • Snake River Plain (SRP);
  • Volcanic rocks;
  • Yellowstone Plateau (YP)

Summary

The Snake River Plain (SRP) is one of the most strikingly anomalous volcano-tectonic provinces in the western U.S. It extends from southwestern Idaho to the Yellowstone Plateau (YP) and consists of an eastern sector that crosses the predominantly NW-trending Basin and Range structures and a western segment bounded by prominent NW-trending faults which parallel the regional structural trends. Development of this province has been attributed to a variety of mechanisms including continental rifting, deformation associated with a leaky(?) transform or propagating crack (possibly controlled by pre-existing lithospheric weaknesses), and hotspot activity related to a proposed mantle plume presently located beneath Yellowstone. Differences between the eastern and western subprovinces indicate that the SRP is a composite feature whose origin involves elements of several of the proposed models. Hotspot-related magmatism may be largely responsible for early (mid-Miocene) volcanism in the western SRP and continuation of this activity eastward to Yellowstone. However, a component of regional SW-NE extension, with accompanying basaltic magmatism, is superimposed on the western portion of the SRP. There may be at most only a small component of extension normal to the axis of the eastern SRP, but such displacements are difficult to quantify at present. This paper summarizes physical and petrochemical constraints which lend insight into the origin of the SRP.