Antarctic Research During the International Geophysical Year

  1. A.P. Crary,
  2. L.M. Gould,
  3. E.O. Hulburt,
  4. Hugh Odishaw and
  5. Waldo E. Smith
  1. H. Wexler

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM001p0007

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

How to Cite

Wexler, H. (1956) Antarctic Research During the International Geophysical Year, in Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic (eds A.P. Crary, L.M. Gould, E.O. Hulburt, H. Odishaw and W. E. Smith), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM001p0007

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1956

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900018

Online ISBN: 9781118669204

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Cape Evans and Cape Adare;
  • Kainan and Okuma Bays;
  • Meteorology;
  • Palmer Peninsula and Little America;
  • Ross Island;
  • Scientific program distribution;
  • United States National Committee, Washington

Summary

During 1957 and 1958 a dozen nations will maintain 40 geophysical stations in Antarctica. Thus, this Continent, the fifth largest in the world, will be subjected to concentrated, coordinated geophysical exploration to a degree not dreamed possible a few years ago. For the first time, geophysical stations will be established for an extended period of time well away from the coasts, deep in the interior of the Continent. Scientists from the participating nations will cooperate in examining the composition, structure, winds, temperatures, and electrical properties of an atmosphere cut off from sunlight for many months. The thickness of the ice will be surveyed for indications of changes in volume to determine if Antarctic climate is changing. The break-up and movement of the peripheral ice will be studied as a function of wind and ocean currents. The aurora australis will be studied and compared with its Northern Hemisphere counterpart. Intensive measurements will be made of geomagnetism, cosmic rays, airglow, and the ionosphere in an attempt to throw light on the physics of the high atmosphere.