Antarctic Photogeography

  1. A.P. Crary,
  2. L.M. Gould,
  3. E.O. Hulburt,
  4. Hugh Odishaw and
  5. Waldo E. Smith
  1. John Roscoe

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM001p0018

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

How to Cite

Roscoe, J. (1956) Antarctic Photogeography, in Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic (eds A.P. Crary, L.M. Gould, E.O. Hulburt, H. Odishaw and W. E. Smith), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM001p0018

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1956

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900018

Online ISBN: 9781118669204

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Keywords:

  • Airphotos;
  • Bases and logistic support;
  • Navigation and light conditions;
  • Photogeography;
  • Required supplementary data;
  • Topography and photo processing;
  • Weather and climate

Summary

The employment of air-photo analysis as a geography research technique is termed photogeography; those skilled in this practice are called photogeographers. In Antarctica, the only continent where the existing aerial photographs contain more geographic and related information than do the maps and publications extant, aerial-photo analysis assumes an unusually significant importance. Since the first aerial photographs were made in 1901 by Scott and von Drygalski, approximately one-fourth of the Continent has been photographed, but only a small portion of the area covered has been examined by surface parties. This photography forms a permanent record of the Antarctic landscape at a given time. Since the area is one of extremely limited accessibility, a significant portion of what is to be learned about the Antarctic must come from this source.

Antarctic aerial photographs have five prospective uses, all of which will be important to IGY scientists. They are: (1) illustration, (2) map making, (3) accessibility studies, (4) detailed area studies, and (5) detailed functional studies (for example, glaciology, morphology, geology, place names, climatology, zoology, oceanography, and aurora and airglow). The status, value, and prospects of Antarctic photogeography are discussed.