Cosmic Ray Experiments Derived from Recent U.S. Antarctic Expeditions

  1. A.P. Crary,
  2. L.M. Gould,
  3. E.O. Hulburt,
  4. Hugh Odishaw and
  5. Waldo E. Smith
  1. J.A. Simpson

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM001p0107

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

How to Cite

Simpson, J.A. (1956) Cosmic Ray Experiments Derived from Recent U.S. Antarctic Expeditions, in Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic (eds A.P. Crary, L.M. Gould, E.O. Hulburt, H. Odishaw and W. E. Smith), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM001p0107

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1956

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900018

Online ISBN: 9781118669204

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Cosmic ray;
  • Geomagnetic equator;
  • Icebreaker HMCS Labrador and USS Atka;
  • Primary cosmic radiation;
  • Solar flare

Summary

Cosmic-ray particles have been used as probes to investigate the distribution of the Earth's permanent magnetic field extending into the interplanetary space. The experiments were performed on the U.S.S. Atka and the U.S.S. Arneb during the two U.S. Antarctic Expeditions in 1954–55 and 1955–56, respectively. These results along with additional data show that this outer magnetic-field distribution is strikingly different from the results based upon magnetic measurements extrapolated from the surface of the Earth. Since the magnetic moment of the Earth's dipole field is inclined with respect to the axis of rotation, the cosmic-ray evidence suggests that the field distortion arises from the interaction of the magnetic field with a highly ionized interplanetary gas. These results also bear on the problem of defining geomagnetic coordinates for incoming charged particles. Preliminary results concerned with (a) the eccentricity of equivalent geomagnetic dipole fields, (b) the latitude effect of cosmic radiation in the Southern Hemisphere, and (c) the detection of solar flare produced cosmic-ray particles are also presented.