Antarctic Fauna and Some of its Problems

  1. A.P. Crary,
  2. L.M. Gould,
  3. E.O. Hulburt,
  4. Hugh Odishaw and
  5. Waldo E. Smith
  1. Carl R. Eklund

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM001p0117

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic

How to Cite

Eklund, C. R. (2013) Antarctic Fauna and Some of its Problems, in Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: Based on a Symposium on the Antarctic (eds A.P. Crary, L.M. Gould, E.O. Hulburt, H. Odishaw and W. E. Smith), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM001p0117

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1956

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900018

Online ISBN: 9781118669204

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Keywords:

  • Birds;
  • Emperor Penguin;
  • Fishes;
  • Mammals;
  • Marine zoology;
  • Terrestrial and fresh-water fauna

Summary

Distribution of birds, mammals, fishes, and other forms of animal life common to the Antarctic region are discussed briefly. These include the emperor and Adelie penguins, and the south polar skua, which species are considered indigenous to the area. Other bird species which either nest or spend considerable time in the region are mentioned. The four pinnipedia considered endemic to the Antarctic zone are the Ross, crabeater, Weddell, and leopard seals, and their habits are cited. Occurrence of marine invertebrates and fishes is shown by phyla, class, or order. Terrestrial fauna consists primarily of arthropods. References are made to some of the past zoological studies, and the inadequacies of our present knowledge of Antarctic animals are considered. A zoological program which might be coordinated with geophysical studies is suggested. This includes collecting, bird banding, seal marking, life-history habits, population dynamics, food habits, seasonal movements, physiological studies, and location of the breeding grounds of the Ross and crabeater seals. The value of paleontological studies is discussed.