Plume Formation in Thunderstorms

  1. Helmut Weickmann
  1. Walter Hitschfeld

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM005p0094

Physics of Precipitation: Proceedings of the Cloud Physics Conference, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, June 3-5, 1959

Physics of Precipitation: Proceedings of the Cloud Physics Conference, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, June 3-5, 1959

How to Cite

Hitschfeld, W. (1960) Plume Formation in Thunderstorms, in Physics of Precipitation: Proceedings of the Cloud Physics Conference, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, June 3-5, 1959 (ed H. Weickmann), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM005p0094

Author Information

  1. Mcgill University, Montreal, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1960

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900056

Online ISBN: 9781118668931

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Keywords:

  • Constant-altitude plan-position indication (CAPPI);
  • Plume patterns;
  • Pulse repetition frequency (PRF );
  • Radar data;
  • Thunderstorms;
  • Wind shears

Summary

Radar data displayed in the form of precipitation maps at constant altitude above ground (CAPPI) portray the structure of storms and their anvils in telling manner. Well-developed storms, even in the presence of severe wind shear, were observed to remain essentially vertical through their active phase. Instead of being strongly bent by the shear, parts of the storm appeared to be carried off by the wind, forming extensive plume patterns or anvils which trailed clown to levels as low as 10,000 ft while evaporating. Size and shape of the plume suggested that its particles had fall speeds ranging from 0.75 to about 5 m sec−1, and thus were of precipitation size.