Variation in the Thickness of the Crust in the Hawaiian Archipelago

  1. Leon Knopoff,
  2. Charles L. Drake and
  3. Pembroke J. Hart
  1. Augustine S. Furumoto,
  2. George P. Woollard,
  3. J. F. Campbell and
  4. D. M. Hussong

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM012p0094

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

How to Cite

Furumoto, A. S., Woollard, G. P., Campbell, J. F. and Hussong, D. M. (2012) Variation in the Thickness of the Crust in the Hawaiian Archipelago, in The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area (eds L. Knopoff, C. L. Drake and P. J. Hart), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM012p0094

Author Information

  1. Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900124

Online ISBN: 9781118663738

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Keywords:

  • Crust thickens;
  • Hawaiian archipelago;
  • Hawaiian ridge and arch;
  • 1966 measurements;
  • Molokai channel;
  • Nemo and Oz;
  • Seismic refraction surveys;
  • Travel time plots

Summary

During 1965 and 1966, a series of seismic refraction surveys were made over the Hawaiian arch, the Hawaiian trench, the Hawaiian ridge, and in the area to the south of the ridge. The crust thickens from about 5.0 to 20 km as one proceeds from the arch toward the ridge. About 300 km south of the ridge, the crust was found to be 9.5 km thick, which is thicker than would be expected for the depth of water present (4.5 km). By combining the present results with earlier data obtained by other investigators, it was found: (1) that the arch and trench show consistent values of crustal thickness (≈5.0 km) from north of Kauai to north of Maui; (2) that the crust under the islands varies between 12 and 20 km in thickness and is complicated by intrusive bodies which have a very high seismic velocity; and (3) that there are marked differences in crustal thickness to the north and to the south of the Hawaiian ridge.