Paleomagnetic Studies of Indian Rocks and Continental Drift

  1. Leon Knopoff,
  2. Charles L. Drake and
  3. Pembroke J. Hart
  1. R. K. Verma and
  2. Hari Narain

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM012p0189

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

How to Cite

Verma, R. K. and Narain, H. (2012) Paleomagnetic Studies of Indian Rocks and Continental Drift, in The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area (eds L. Knopoff, C. L. Drake and P. J. Hart), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM012p0189

Author Information

  1. National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900124

Online ISBN: 9781118663738

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Keywords:

  • Continental drift;
  • Deccan traps;
  • Godavari valley;
  • Indian and Jurassic rocks;
  • Paleomagnetic study;
  • Permian;
  • Precambrian formations;
  • Red sandstones

Summary

Paleomagnetic studies have been made of Indian rocks ranging in age from Upper Permian to Miocene, and of a few Precambrian formations. Formations that had been studied earlier in detail are the Deccan trap volcanics ranging in age from Upper Cretaceous to Miocene, and Rajmahal and Sylhet traps of Jurasic age. Recent paleomagnetic studies of Tirupati red sandstones of Middle Cretaceous age and of the Kamthi formation of Upper Permian age from Godavari valley have given further evidence in support of continental drift of the Indian land mass. The mean virtual geomagnetic pole position for Timpati sandstones is 28°N, 73°W, and for the Kamthi formation is 18°N, 53°W. The results of these studies are consistent with the position of India (reference town, Nagpur) in the southern hemisphere during Upper Permian to Eocene times. The results also give a strong indication of geomagnetic field reversal during Middle and Upper Cretaceous times, while during the Upper Permian times the field appears to have been normal. The northward drift of the Indian continent seems to have occurred mostly during Jurassic and Miocene times through a distance of nearly 6000 km.