Geodetic Measurements for the Study of Crustal Movements

  1. Leon Knopoff,
  2. Charles L. Drake and
  3. Pembroke J. Hart
  1. Charles A. Whitten

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM012p0342

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

How to Cite

Whitten, C. A. (2012) Geodetic Measurements for the Study of Crustal Movements, in The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area (eds L. Knopoff, C. L. Drake and P. J. Hart), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM012p0342

Author Information

  1. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Environmental Science Services Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900124

Online ISBN: 9781118663738

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Keywords:

  • Conventional power series;
  • Crustal movements;
  • Geodetic measurements;
  • Linear movement;
  • Polynomials;
  • Pre- and post-earthquake surveys

Summary

Geodetic techniques have been used for more than half a century to measure the amount of displacement on the surface at the time of an earthquake, to monitor the slippage that occurs along some fault lines, and to determine rates of creep between the opposite sides of a broad fault zone. Various types of mathematical analyses involving repeat surveys and comparing angular measurements, geographic positions, or elevations have been used for the study of crustal movement. A broader type of analysis is proposed in which a three-dimensional mathematical model with a fourth parameter for time is calculated for a specific portion of the earth's crust. All types of geodetic measurements would be used as “input” for the model referencing the data in position and time. Special provision would be made for the discontinuity produced by rebound at the time of an earthquake. The ‘output' would be three-dimensional annual rates of movement at uniformly spaced grid points. Components of strain at or between these grid points could be computed from these rates of movement.