Geothermal and Geomagnetic Data in and Around the Island Arc of Japan

  1. Leon Knopoff,
  2. Charles L. Drake and
  3. Pembroke J. Hart
  1. Seiya Uyeda1 and
  2. Victor Vacquier2

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM012p0349

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

How to Cite

Uyeda, S. and Vacquier, V. (2012) Geothermal and Geomagnetic Data in and Around the Island Arc of Japan, in The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area (eds L. Knopoff, C. L. Drake and P. J. Hart), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM012p0349

Author Information

  1. 1

    Geophysical Institute, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

  2. 2

    Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900124

Online ISBN: 9781118663738

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Keywords:

  • Earthquake Research Institute (ERI);
  • Geomagnetic and geothermal data;
  • Heat flow unit (HFU);
  • Japanese island arc;
  • Magnetic data;
  • Marginal seas;
  • Northwestern Pacific basin;
  • Terrestrial heat flow data

Summary

Data on heat flow and total geomagnetic force so far obtained in Japan and vicinity are reviewed. Maps showing the distribution of heat flow, total magnetic field, and its anomalies are presented for the area 28°N to 46°N, 128°E to 170°E, and the main features are summarized: heat flow is high in the marginal seas, such as the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk Sea, and in the inner zone of the island arc; it is low on the Pacific Ocean side of the arc and in the trench zone. The Northwestern Pacific basin has uniformly subnormal heat flow. At least three groups of distinct linear geomagnetic anomaly bands are found to run ENE-WSW in the Pacific off Japan. Linear trends are found in the Sea of Japan, but they are much less distinct. The data are then examined in the light of the ocean floor spreading hypothesis: it is not possible to decide the direction of possible spreading from the data now available. Further magnetic surveys in the north Pacific and heat flow surveys on the continent of Asia and its margin should be encouraged.