Chlorine Content of Volcanic Rocks and Migration of Chlorine from the Mantle to The Surface of the Earth

  1. Leon Knopoff,
  2. Charles L. Drake and
  3. Pembroke J. Hart
  1. I. Iwasaki,
  2. T. Katsura,
  3. T. Ozawa,
  4. M. Yoshida and
  5. B. Iwasaki

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM012p0423

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area

How to Cite

Iwasaki, I., Katsura, T., Ozawa, T., Yoshida, M. and Iwasaki, B. (2012) Chlorine Content of Volcanic Rocks and Migration of Chlorine from the Mantle to The Surface of the Earth, in The Crust and Upper Mantle of the Pacific Area (eds L. Knopoff, C. L. Drake and P. J. Hart), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM012p0423

Author Information

  1. Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Geochemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Geophysical Monograph Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Waldo E. Smith

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900124

Online ISBN: 9781118663738

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Keywords:

  • Chlorine;
  • Igneous rocks;
  • Magmas;
  • Olivine;
  • Ultrabasic rocks;
  • Volcanic rocks

Summary

The chlorine content of more than 500 igneous rocks, from acidic to ultrabasic, was determined by the mercuric thiocyanate method. Volatilization of chlorine compounds from igneous rocks on heating and solubility of hydrogen chloride in the molten rocks were also studied. The results indicate that migration of chlorine from the mantle to the surface of the earth can be explained as follows: when rocks or meteoritic materials are partially melted to form magmas, most chlorine compounds will be introduced into the magmas and magmatic emanations. A large amount of ultrabasic rock must remain in the deep part of the earth owing to genesis of these magmas. The chlorine content of dunite and of olivine in basalts was found to be very small. Furthermore, chlorine compounds will migrate gradually to the surface of the earth with movement of the magmatic emanations. If chlorine compounds have been migrating from the mantle to the surface of the earth throughout the period of the development of the earth, the excess amount of chloride in the ocean is easily explained.