Geophysical Measurements in the Southern Great Plains

  1. John G. Heacock
  1. B. J. Mitchell and
  2. M. Landisman

Published Online: 15 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM014p0077

The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust

The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust

How to Cite

Mitchell, B. J. and Landisman, M. (1971) Geophysical Measurements in the Southern Great Plains, in The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust (ed J. G. Heacock), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM014p0077

Author Information

  1. Geosciences Division, University of Texas At Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75230

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1971

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900148

Online ISBN: 9781118664049

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Keywords:

  • Chelsea and Manitou shot points;
  • Electrical resistivity;
  • Gravity;
  • Low-velocity layer;
  • Northwestern Texas;
  • Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico;
  • Seismic velocity models;
  • Southern Great Plains

Summary

Detailed seismic velocity models for Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico are compared in order to study lateral variations of the crust within a single geologic province. The lower three crustal layers in each model are similar in thickness and velocity and appear to be continuous across a major fault zone. Detailed study of the reversed refraction profile in Oklahoma favors an interpretation in which the shallowest continuous seismic interface is encountered at a depth of about 18 km, just beneath a crustal low-velocity layer; this feature apparently extends to eastern New Mexico, where recordings of the Gnome explosion can be interpreted in terms of a crustal velocity reversal with a lower boundary approximately 23 km beneath the surface. The total crustal thickness increases from 46 to 52 km between Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico; the increase is confined largely to the upper portions of the crust. Observations of shear wave travel times, crustal transfer functions determined from teleseismic body waves, and observed gravity differences support the compressional velocity models derived earlier. The low-velocity layer in eastern New Mexico may correlate with a zone of reduced electrical resistivity in northwestern Texas.