Radio Propagation Through the Crust—Retrospect and Prospect

  1. John G. Heacock
  1. S. Benedict Levin

Published Online: 15 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM014p0333

The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust

The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust

How to Cite

Levin, S. B. (1971) Radio Propagation Through the Crust—Retrospect and Prospect, in The Structure and Physical Properties of the Earth's Crust (ed J. G. Heacock), American Geophysical Union, Washington D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM014p0333

Author Information

  1. Earth Satellite Corporation, Washington, D.C. 20036

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1971

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900148

Online ISBN: 9781118664049

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Keywords:

  • Earth's crust;
  • Experimental-analytical petrology;
  • Geochemistry;
  • Geothermal geophysics;
  • Radio-propagation;
  • Seismology and areal geology;
  • Solid state physics

Summary

The feasibility of achieving long range communication and remote sensing by radio within the depths of the earth's crust depends on the electrical properties of the constituent rocks, the variation of those properties in the vertical (radial) direction, and their electrical homogeneity laterally (tangentially) over great distances. Laboratory measurements of dry specimens of representative crustal rocks lead to the inference that there may exist, at depths below approximately 7 km, a zone whose conductivity at very low frequencies may be less than 10−6 mho/m and which may therefore permit radio propagation over distances of many hundreds to a thousand kilometers. Field measurements, however, and laboratory measurements of wet rocks lead to the inference that crustal resistivities do not fall below approximately 10−5 mho/m and, hence, that long range radio communication is probably not feasible. The resolution of these apparently conflicting views requires further resea.rch in several interdisciplinary fields of the earth- and radio-sciences.