Detailed Gravimetric Geoid for the United States

  1. Soren W. Henriksen,
  2. Armando Mancini and
  3. Bernard H. Chovitz
  1. William E. Strange1,
  2. Samir F. Vincent1,
  3. Richard H. Berry1 and
  4. James G. Marsh2

Published Online: 15 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM015p0169

The Use of Artificial Satellites for Geodesy

The Use of Artificial Satellites for Geodesy

How to Cite

Strange, W. E., Vincent, S. F., Berry, R. H. and Marsh, J. G. (1972) Detailed Gravimetric Geoid for the United States, in The Use of Artificial Satellites for Geodesy (eds S. W. Henriksen, A. Mancini and B. H. Chovitz), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM015p0169

Author Information

  1. 1

    Computer Sciences Corporation, Falls Church, Virginia 22046

  2. 2

    Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1972

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900155

Online ISBN: 9781118663646

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Keywords:

  • Fischer's map;
  • Geoid computation;
  • Geoid heights relative;
  • Gravimetric geoid;
  • Stokes' function

Summary

A detailed gravimetric geoid was computed for the United States using a combination of satellite-derived spherical harmonic coefficients and 1° by 1° mean gravity values from surface gravimetry. Comparisons of this geoid with astrogeodetic geoid data indicate that a precision of ±2 meters has been obtained. Translations only were used to convert the NAD astrogeodetic geoid heights to geocentric astrogeodetic heights. On the basis of the agreement between the geocentric astrogeodetic geoid heights and the gravimetric geoid heights, no evidence is found for rotation in the North American datum. The value of the zero-order undulation can vary by 10 to 20 meters, depending on which investigator's station positions are used to establish it.