Electron Beam Studies of Individual Natural and Anthropogenic Microparticles: Compositions, Structures, and Surface Reactions

  1. David R. Schryer
  1. Peter R. Buseck and
  2. John P. Bradley

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM026p0057

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

How to Cite

Buseck, P. R. and Bradley, J. P. (1982) Electron Beam Studies of Individual Natural and Anthropogenic Microparticles: Compositions, Structures, and Surface Reactions, in Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry (ed D. R. Schryer), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM026p0057

Author Information

  1. Departments of Chemistry and Geology, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900513

Online ISBN: 9781118663813

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Keywords:

  • Atmospheric chemistry—Addresses, essays, lectures

Summary

Quantitative chemical data can be obtained from individual submicron particles from aerosols by using an electron microprobe, analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM), or transmission electron microscope (TEM). Such analytical data, in combination with high-resolution TEM images, can reflect both the origin and events in the evolution of microparticles. Surface deposits on microparticles appear to be wide-spread. Such deposits are prominent features of fly ash from copper smelters, where we have detected species of Zn, S, and C. Complex reaction sequences have also been recognized on aerosol particles; carbonaceous pseudomorphs after Zn0 reflect an evolutionary sequence, including a change from oxidizing to reducing conditions. Long carbon filaments containing CuZn particles indicate catalytic growth and are distinctive indicators of their sources. All of these unique particles can be used for source attribution.