Atmospheric Gases on Cold Surfaces - Condensation, Thermal Desorption, and Chemical Reactions

  1. David R. Schryer
  1. R. J. Fezza and
  2. J. M. Calo

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM026p0157

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

How to Cite

Fezza, R. J. and Calo, J. M. (1982) Atmospheric Gases on Cold Surfaces - Condensation, Thermal Desorption, and Chemical Reactions, in Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry (ed D. R. Schryer), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM026p0157

Author Information

  1. Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900513

Online ISBN: 9781118663813

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Keywords:

  • Atmospheric chemistry—Addresses, essays, lectures

Summary

Selected results of potential significance to heterogeneous processes in the natural atmosphere are presented from a study of the behavior of atmospheric gases and vapors on cold surfaces. In particular, the occurrence of a strong “first” condensation at relatively high temperatures (200–250 K) was observed for N2O, CO2, NO, Freon 11, and Freon 12, ranging from approximately 10 percent of the incident beam (e.g., for CO2) to 90 percent (e.g., for N2O and NO). All the data are consistent with efficient trapping of these species under highly unsaturated conditions by a continually renewing water sublayer, probably with a solid clathrate hydratetype structure.

Temperature-programmed desorption with mass spectrometric detection and flash desorption with subsequent chemiluminescence analysis were applied to studies of the reactions of nitric oxide and ozone upon thermal desorption. The most salient results are (1) disproportionation of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide and nitrogen during desorption of pure nitric oxide condensate at levels exceeding 50 percent, (2) significant recombination of ozone upon flash desorption, and (3) oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide by ozone upon desorption of nitric-oxide/ozone condensates. Some implications of these results to heterogeneous processes in the natural atmosphere are considered in this paper.