Sulfur Dioxide Absorption, Oxidation, and Oxidation Inhibition in Falling Drops: An Experimental/Modeling Approach

  1. David R. Schryer
  1. Elmar R. Altwicker and
  2. Clement Kleinstreuer

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM026p0178

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

How to Cite

Altwicker, E. R. and Kleinstreuer, C. (1982) Sulfur Dioxide Absorption, Oxidation, and Oxidation Inhibition in Falling Drops: An Experimental/Modeling Approach, in Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry (ed D. R. Schryer), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM026p0178

Author Information

  1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12181

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900513

Online ISBN: 9781118663813

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Keywords:

  • Atmospheric chemistry—Addresses, essays, lectures

Summary

Results are reported on the absorption of sulfur dioxide into falling water drops, the extent of oxidation of S(IV) species in the liquid phase, and the inhibition of this oxidation. Experimental results obtained in a laboratory “string-of-falling-drops” system for 0.36-second drop fall time have been compared to calculations based on several absorption models found in the literature. Some of the differences between the experimental results and those from the model calculations emphasize the need for more detailed understanding of initial and non-steady-state behavior. Our own modeling approach, which consists primarily of a hydroaerodynamic and a mass-transfer-with-chemical-reaction submodel, is proposed. Initial comparisons between model and experiment show reasonable agreement, but also point to the need for more detailed understanding of rate processes at the interface. The significance of the experimental/modeling approach lies in its applicability to non-steady-state processes, such as initial rates of SO2 absorption and reaction in cloud and raindrops, plume washout, and interaction of droplet sprays with waste gases.