On the Role of Global-Scale Waves in Ice-Albedo and Vegetation-Albedo Feedback

  1. James E. Hansen and
  2. Taro Takahashi
  1. Dennis L. Hartmann

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM029p0018

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

How to Cite

Hartmann, D. L. (2013) On the Role of Global-Scale Waves in Ice-Albedo and Vegetation-Albedo Feedback, in Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity (eds J. E. Hansen and T. Takahashi), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM029p0018

Author Information

  1. Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Quaternary Research Center University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904047

Online ISBN: 9781118666036

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Keywords:

  • Climatology—Congresses;
  • Geophysics—Congresses;
  • Ocean-atmosphere interaction—Congresses

Summary

Quasi-stationary planetary waves are the major contributor to interannual variability of local climate. These waves can interact with climate feedback mechanisms to enhance the sensitivity of the Earth's climate. In high latitudes planetary waves can encourage ice-albedo feedback over the continents. In the tropics planetary-scale circulations are associated with the movement of precipitation between land and ocean. The movement of precipitation between land and ocean gives rise to planetary albedo changes through vegetation-albedo feedback and through a new, more direct mechanism involving the contrast in clear-sky albedo between land and ocean areas. It is demonstrated that interannual and intraseasonal variability in mid-latitude planetary waves can cause tropical precipitation to shift between land and ocean. The importance of the location of tropical cloudiness for the radiation budget and the ability of the internal dynamics of the atmosphere to move cloudiness combine to produce a potentially important feedback mechanism