Climate Sensitivity and the Marginal Cryosphere

  1. James E. Hansen and
  2. Taro Takahashi
  1. R. G. Barry1,
  2. A. Henderson-Sellers2 and
  3. K. P. Shine2

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM029p0221

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

How to Cite

Barry, R. G., Henderson-Sellers, A. and Shine, K. P. (1984) Climate Sensitivity and the Marginal Cryosphere, in Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity (eds J. E. Hansen and T. Takahashi), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM029p0221

Author Information

  1. 1

    Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder.

  2. 2

    Department of Geography, University of Liverpool, England.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904047

Online ISBN: 9781118666036

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Keywords:

  • Climatology—Congresses;
  • Geophysics—Congresses;
  • Ocean-atmosphere interaction—Congresses

Summary

There is a significant dearth of information on high-latitude cloudiness and the surface properties of the seasonal cryosphere, and on the degree of association between them. Following a survey of available data, some new observational material is presented on cloud conditions in the vicinity of snow cover and sea ice margins, using both 3-D Nephanalysis data and DMSP imagery. 1-D radiative calculations are used to illustrate the urgent need for improved observational data on cloud cover and surface albedo. The presence of cloud cover strongly damps the net effect on planetary albedo of any perturbation in snow/ice extent; an effect which is neglected in simple treatments of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism. The general problem of the appropriate parameterization of high-latitude surface albedo and cloud regimes in GCMs is discussed in the context of the review of observational data. Results from the new GISS GCM illustrate some important problems to be overcome in all climate models.