On the Relationship between Ocean Chemistry and Atmospheric pCO2 During the Cenozoic

  1. James E. Hansen and
  2. Taro Takahashi
  1. Michael L. Bender

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM029p0352

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity

How to Cite

Bender, M. L. (1984) On the Relationship between Ocean Chemistry and Atmospheric pCO2 During the Cenozoic, in Climate Processes and Climate Sensitivity (eds J. E. Hansen and T. Takahashi), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM029p0352

Author Information

  1. Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904047

Online ISBN: 9781118666036

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Keywords:

  • Climatology—Congresses;
  • Geophysics—Congresses;
  • Ocean-atmosphere interaction—Congresses

Summary

A simple two-box model of ocean chemistry is used to calculate the changes in atmospheric pCO2 which would be associated with various related changes in ocean properties. The results show that no major variations of pCO2 are implied by the observed range of deep ocean temperature, carbonate compensation depth, or seawater calcium concentrations during the Cenozoic. pCO2 changes associated with the poorly constrained or simply unknown variations in the deep ocean total and preformed nutrient concentrations, and in the ratio of CaCO3/CH2O in the raining particulate matter, were probably also small, but the results are equivocal. Atmospheric pCO2 is a very sensitive function of seawater TCO2 and TA; as paleoceanographic values of these parameters are not well constrained, it is not yet possible to place useful limits on paleoatmospheric pCO2 from the sedimentary record.