Changes in Calcium Carbonate Accumulation in the Equatorial Pacific During the Late Cenozoic: Evidence from HPC Site 572

  1. E.T. Sundquist and
  2. W.S. Broecker
  1. Nicklas G. Pisias1 and
  2. Warren L. Prell2

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM032p0443

The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO: Natural Variations Archean to Present

The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO: Natural Variations Archean to Present

How to Cite

Pisias, N. G. and Prell, W. L. (1985) Changes in Calcium Carbonate Accumulation in the Equatorial Pacific During the Late Cenozoic: Evidence from HPC Site 572, in The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO: Natural Variations Archean to Present (eds E.T. Sundquist and W.S. Broecker), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM032p0443

Author Information

  1. 1

    College of Oceanography, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331

  2. 2

    Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900605

Online ISBN: 9781118664322

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Keywords:

  • Carbon cycle (Biogeochemistry)—Congresses;
  • Atmospheric carbon dioxide—Congresses;
  • Geological time—Congresses;
  • Paleothermometry—Congresses;
  • Geology, Stratigraphic—Congresses

Summary

Hydraulic Piston Core Site 572, located at 1°N, 114°W (3903 m), recovered a continuous hydraulic piston cored section of late Miocene to late Pleistocene pelagic sediments. The sediment is composed of biogenic carbonate and silica, with nonbiogenic material being only a minor component. Detailed analysis of the calcium carbonate content shows that both the degree of variability in carbonate deposition and total carbonate accumulation changed markedly between the late Miocene and Pliocene at this equatorial Pacific site. During this interval, carbonate mass accumulation rates decrease from 2.6 to 0.8 g cm−2 (1000 years)−1. Comparison with other data shows that the marked change in accumulation of calcium carbonate at this site does not represent a change in the carbonate budget of the equatorial Pacific but rather a redistribution of carbonate in this region. The detailed carbonate records from the Pliocene section of Site 572 suggest that changing carbonate deposition controls the carbonate percent records. During the late Miocene, however, variations in biogenic silica accumulation play an important role in controlling the variations in calcium carbonate percentage at this site.