Dating and Climatic Interpretation of Two Deep Greenland Ice Cores

  1. C.C. Langway Jr.,
  2. H. Oeschger and
  3. W. Dansgaard
  1. W. Dansgaard,
  2. H. B. Clausen,
  3. N. Gundestrup,
  4. S. J. Johnsen and
  5. C. Rygner

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM033p0071

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

How to Cite

Dansgaard, W., Clausen, H. B., Gundestrup, N., Johnsen, S. J. and Rygner, C. (1985) Dating and Climatic Interpretation of Two Deep Greenland Ice Cores, in Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment (eds C.C. Langway, H. Oeschger and W. Dansgaard), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM033p0071

Author Information

  1. Geophysical Isotope Laboratory, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900575

Online ISBN: 9781118664155

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Keywords:

  • Ice sheets—Greenland—Addresses, essays, lectures;
  • Greenland Ice Sheet Program

Summary

A continuous δ(18O) profile is measured along the new deep ice core from Dye 3, South Greenland. It allows absolute dating back to at least 7000 yrs BP. The Pleistocene to Holocene δ shift is discussed. The Wisconsin ice in the deepest 300 m has so many δ features in common with the Camp Century (CC) ice core that they must be of climatic significance. The deep parts of the two δ profiles are indirectly dated by tentative correlation with a deep sea foraminifera record. The CC record seems to be continuous to more than 125,000 yrs BP, and it suggests a dramatic termination of the Eem/Sangamon interglacial. The Dye 3 record, however, is hardly continuous to more than 90,000 yrs BP, although the deepest 22 m of silty ice is probably of Eem/Sangamon origin. The basic criteria for an ideal deep drilling site are listed.