Chloride, Nitrate, and Sulfate in the Dye 3 and Camp Century, Greenland Ice Cores

  1. C.C. Langway Jr.,
  2. H. Oeschger and
  3. W. Dansgaard
  1. Michael M. Herron and
  2. Chester C. Langway Jr.

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM033p0077

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

How to Cite

Herron, M. M. and Langway, C. C. (1985) Chloride, Nitrate, and Sulfate in the Dye 3 and Camp Century, Greenland Ice Cores, in Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment (eds C.C. Langway, H. Oeschger and W. Dansgaard), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM033p0077

Author Information

  1. State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Geological Sciences, Ice Core Laboratory, Amherst, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900575

Online ISBN: 9781118664155

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Keywords:

  • Ice sheets—Greenland—Addresses, essays, lectures;
  • Greenland Ice Sheet Program

Summary

Concentrations of Cl, NO3 , and SO4 2− were measured over the entire depth interval of the deep ice cores from Dye 3 and Camp Century. Using a preliminary time scale for the Dye 3 core and the published Camp Century time scale, the chemical profiles reveal dramatic, synchronous changes in precipitation composition over the last 90,000 years. The Holocene-Wisconsin boundary is marked by a sudden increase in concentrations with increasing depth of all constituents. In the Dye 3 core this transition occurs over an interval of less than 50 cm for SO4 2− and NO3 , and less than 200 cm for Cl at a depth of 1786 m. Late Wisconsin ice is characterized by lower NO3 and higher Cl and SO4 2− concentrations compared to Holocene levels. Long periods of intensive volcanic activity are indicated by sporadic SO4 2− and lesser Cl peaks from 10,000 to 20,000 BP and 25,000 to 30,000 BP. The background SO2− 4 concentrations in the Dye 3 core indicate that Late Wisconsin snow accumulation rates were as little as 22% of the present rate, assuming a constant SO4 2− flux. A method is outlined whereby the paleoelevations and perhaps the rate of disintegration of unstable ice masses, such as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, can be obtained from Cl concentration profiles.