CO2 Concentration in Air Extracted from Greenland Ice Samples

  1. C.C. Langway Jr.,
  2. H. Oeschger and
  3. W. Dansgaard
  1. B. Stauffer,
  2. A. Neftel,
  3. H. Oeschger and
  4. J. Schwander

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM033p0085

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment

How to Cite

Stauffer, B., Neftel, A., Oeschger, H. and Schwander, J. (1985) CO2 Concentration in Air Extracted from Greenland Ice Samples, in Greenland Ice Core: Geophysics, Geochemistry, and the Environment (eds C.C. Langway, H. Oeschger and W. Dansgaard), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM033p0085

Author Information

  1. Physics Institute, University of Bern, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900575

Online ISBN: 9781118664155

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Keywords:

  • Ice sheets—Greenland—Addresses, essays, lectures;
  • Greenland Ice Sheet Program

Summary

The principal aim of the analyses of the CO2 concentration in air extracted from ice samples is to reconstruct the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere during the last millenia. For this purpose ice from very cold regions is best suited. Ice samples from Dye 3, where the mean annual air temperature is −20°C and summer melting is frequent, are not very well suited from this point of view. The results of CO2 analyses give however very valuable information on a possible temperature effect on the CO2 concentration of air in the bubbles. The CO2 content show's seasonal variations with an annual maximum value in the summer melt layer. The annual minimum values correspond approximately to the estimated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Based on this experience, in spite of the complications due to the melt features, we try to reconstruct the history of the CO2 concentrations of the atmosphere. of special interest are the fast climatic transitions in the course and especially at the end of the last glaciation which are represented in the ice core by changes of parameters like acidity, dust, and istopic ratios in short depth intervals.

In this respect we discuss the time lag between the climatic warming at the end of the last glaciation and the increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Finally results of gas content and gas composition of two ice samples from the lowest, silty part of the ice core are discussed.