Deformation Induced Recrystallization of Ice: The Application of in Situ Experiments

  1. B.E. Hobbs and
  2. H.C. Heard
  1. C. J. L. Wilson

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM036p0213

Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume

Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume

How to Cite

Wilson, C. J. L. (1986) Deformation Induced Recrystallization of Ice: The Application of in Situ Experiments, in Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume (eds B.E. Hobbs and H.C. Heard), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM036p0213

Author Information

  1. School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900629

Online ISBN: 9781118664353

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Keywords:

  • Rocks—Testing—Addresses, essays, lectures;
  • Rock deformation—Addresses, essays, lectures

Summary

Evidence for nucleation in natural and experimentally deformed polycrystalline aggregates of ice is discussed, and the observation of dynamic recrystallization during in situ experiments is described. Deformation in the temperature range above −5°C produces marked adjustments along pre-existing grain boundaries, slip and grain rotation on (0001), deformation band and kink band formation, new grain nucleation and boundary migration. The dominant nucleation mechanism and accompanying changes in grain shape and size involve dynamic recrystallization by rotation of subgrains and/or bulging of new high angle or pre-existing boundaries, through a process of migration recrystallization. There is little evidence for a distinct intercrystalline nucleation mechanism, even though many of the intracrystalline nuclei are dominantly on the margins of the host grain. This is attributed to the high plastic anisotropy on (0001), causing the deformation to be inhomogeneous with lattice rotation being concentrated in the grain boundary regions. Grains in the boundary undergo the greatest degree of rotation and also show the highest grain boundary mobility. Superimposed on these phenomena there may be post-deformation annealing where: (1) recovery annealing produces local boundary migration with a further reduction of internal strain energy or (2) thermal annealing, where there is a general grain size increase in response to a rise in temperature.