Heterogeneous Strain in Axial Deformation of Limestone, Textural Evidence

  1. B.E. Hobbs and
  2. H.C. Heard
  1. H.-R. Wenk1,
  2. H. Kern2,
  3. P. Van Houtte3 and
  4. F. Wagner4

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM036p0287

Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume

Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume

How to Cite

Wenk, H.-R., Kern, H., Van Houtte, P. and Wagner, F. (1986) Heterogeneous Strain in Axial Deformation of Limestone, Textural Evidence, in Mineral and Rock Deformation: Laboratory Studies: The Paterson Volume (eds B.E. Hobbs and H.C. Heard), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM036p0287

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California

  2. 2

    Institut für Mineralogie und Petrographie, Universität, Kiel, West Germanys

  3. 3

    Department Metaalkunde, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium

  4. 4

    Laboratoire de Métallurgie Structurale, Université, Metz, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900629

Online ISBN: 9781118664353

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Keywords:

  • Rocks—Testing—Addresses, essays, lectures;
  • Rock deformation—Addresses, essays, lectures

Summary

The full constraint Taylor theory has been successful in predicting textures of calcite rocks deformed in plane strain at low and high temperature. The same approach failed to explain texture development in axial deformation. Textures provide evidence that deformation is heterogeneous and that individual crystals or groups of grains deform in plane strain, rather than axial symmetry. The problem was approached quantitatively with the relaxed Taylor theory. If we relax dε22dε11 and dε12 (m compression and extension) we maintain overall axial symmetry but allow for “curling” which has been observed in f.c.c. metals. A second relaxation applies to flat grains dε23 = dε31 = 0 (in compression). Both relaxed models predict textures which are in much better agreement with experimental observations than full constraint Taylor calculations.