The Neutral Lithium Velocity Distribution of an AMPTE Solar Wind Release as Inferred from Lithium Ion Measurements on the Uks Spacecraft

  1. Tom Chang,
  2. M. K. Hudson,
  3. J. R. Jasperse,
  4. R. G. Johnson,
  5. P. M. Kintner and
  6. M. Schulz
  1. S. C. Chapman1,
  2. A. D. Johnstone2 and
  3. S. W. H. Cowley1

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM038p0179

Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere

Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere

How to Cite

Chapman, S. C., Johnstone, A. D. and Cowley, S. W. H. (1986) The Neutral Lithium Velocity Distribution of an AMPTE Solar Wind Release as Inferred from Lithium Ion Measurements on the Uks Spacecraft, in Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere (eds T. Chang, M. K. Hudson, J. R. Jasperse, R. G. Johnson, P. M. Kintner and M. Schulz), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM038p0179

Author Information

  1. 1

    Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science and Technology, LONDON, SW7 2BZ, United Kingdom

  2. 2

    Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, DORKING, Surrey, RH5 6NT, United Kingdom

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900636

Online ISBN: 9781118664216

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Keywords:

  • Magnetosphere—Congresses;
  • Ionosphere—Congresses;
  • Ion flow dynamics—Congresses;
  • Space plasmas—Congresses

Summary

As part of the AMPTE mission on 20 September 1984 a neutral lithium release was made in the quiet solar wind. The MSSL ion instrument on board the AMPTE-UKS spacecraft that was positioned ∼30 km from the release centre enabled measurements of significant fluxes of lithium ions to be made for ∼3 min. after the release, that is, long after the effects of the initial ( ∼25s) local perturbation to the field and flow had died away. These lithium test ions move in cycloidal orbits in the steady ambient fields, so that measurements of their fluxes at the UKS can be used to infer the velocity distribution function of the collisionless neutral cloud over a restricted region in velocity space. These restrictions are such that the ion data cannot easily be used to infer whether or not the neutral f(v) is shell-like, but do allow us to show that significant anisotropy is present.