Laboratory Simulation of Magnetospheric Plasma Phenomena Using Laser Induced Fluorescence as a Diagnostic

  1. Tom Chang,
  2. M. K. Hudson,
  3. J. R. Jasperse,
  4. R. G. Johnson,
  5. P. M. Kintner and
  6. M. Schulz
  1. Nathan Rynn

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM038p0235

Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere

Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere

How to Cite

Rynn, N. (1986) Laboratory Simulation of Magnetospheric Plasma Phenomena Using Laser Induced Fluorescence as a Diagnostic, in Ion Acceleration in the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere (eds T. Chang, M. K. Hudson, J. R. Jasperse, R. G. Johnson, P. M. Kintner and M. Schulz), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM038p0235

Author Information

  1. Department of Physics, University of California, Irvine, California 92717

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900636

Online ISBN: 9781118664216

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Keywords:

  • Magnetosphere—Congresses;
  • Ionosphere—Congresses;
  • Ion flow dynamics—Congresses;
  • Space plasmas—Congresses

Summary

There are many magnetospheric plasma effects that can be simulated in the laboratory. Among them are electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves, multiple ion effects, and lower-hybrid waves. At U.C. Irvine a powerful diagnostic tool has been developed that permits the direct observation of the ion disribution function and density as a function of time and position. The technique uses laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in a barium plasma in a Q-machine. We have been able to induce the EIC instability and to investigate a possible mechanism for auroral electron acceleration or for producing a potential drop. We have also been able to explore the effects of multiple species on ion heating. Recently, we have begun an investigation into the effects of excitation by broad-band lower-hybrid waves. We have been able to show bulk and tail heating of ions.